Academic Credit for Research

Research for Credit

 BIOSC 1901, 1903 or 1904 [Honors]; S/N grades only

Students can earn academic credit for research if it is unpaid, by working 5 hours per week for each credit. You may register for 1-6 credits in a term, using up to 24 credits as free electives towards your 120 degree credits required by the School of Arts and Sciences. Typically, 1 - 3 credits per term is earned, except perhaps for Seniors who have completed most of their requirements and wish to devote considerable time to a research project. Keep in mind that 3 research credits entails 15 hours per week in the lab. Students are responsible for paying for the research credits as they would any other course.

  • Research credits CANNOT be used as BIOSC electives within any of the majors in the Department of Biological Sciences.
  • Honors credits are reserved for students who have applied for graduation with Departmental Honors. See the Departmental Honors page for more information.
  • If you would like to work in a lab outside of the Department, you may still receive credits by arranging for a Biological Sciences Departmental co-sponsor, who will work with you and your "external" sponsor to verify your participation and monitor your progress. You can determine if a faculty member is willing to sponsor your work by contacting them and providing details of your work.
  • If you are being paid to work in any research lab, you cannot receive these BIOSC credits. However, note that Departmental Honors can still be awarded if research is done in this context. Be sure to coordinate your efforts - and your paperwork - with both your mentor and the Advising Office if this is the case.

To gain credit for undergraduate research, you must complete the appropriate form - available online or in the Advising Office (A258 Langley). Once completed, return the form to the Biological Sciences advisors before the add/drop deadline each term. You cannot self-enroll in research credits because department consent is required.

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If you’re a freshman and not sure about research, get started with the introductory academic research lab courses.