Teresa Buck

  • Research Assistant Professor

Contact

Office: (412) 624-4830
A321 Langley Hall
4249 Fifth Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15260

Buck, T. M., L. Plavchak, A. Roy, B. F. Donnell

Buck, T. M., L. Plavchak, A. Roy, B. F. Donnelly, O. B. Kashlan, T. R. Kleyman, A. R. Subramanya, J. L. Brodsky. The Lhs1/GRP170 chaperones facilitate the endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation of the epithelial sodium channel.  J. Biol. Chem. (2013) 288: 18366-18380

Buck, T.M., A.R. Kolb, C.R. Boyd, T.R. Kleyman, and J.L. Brodsky (2010) The endoplasmic reticulum

Buck, T.M., A.R. Kolb, C.R. Boyd, T.R. Kleyman, and J.L. Brodsky (2010) The endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation of the epithelial sodium channel requires a unique complement of molecular chaperones. Mol Biol Cell 21:1047-1058

Kolb, A. R., T. M. Buck, and J. L. Brodsky (2011) Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model sy

Kolb, A. R., T. M. Buck, and J. L. Brodsky (2011) Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system for kidney disease: What can yeast tell us about renal function? Am. J. Physiol. 301: F1-F11
Dr. Buck received a B.A. in Biology from Carroll College in Helena MT. She went on to join the Integrated Biomedical Sciences Graduate program at Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, OR where she completed her doctoral work under the supervision of Dr. Bill Skach in 2006.