Maria Teresa Sáenz Robles

  • Research Assistant Professor

Contact

Office: (412) 624-4322
578 Crawford Hall
4249 Fifth Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15260

Do “normal” and “tumorigenic” cells use the same mechanisms to mediate cell proliferation and maintain homeostasis? The small intestine constitutes an excellent material on which to analyze the properties of actively growing and differentiating cells, as well as to study the mechanisms governing tumor induction. Within the intestine, the stem and differentiated cell populations are in physically distinct compartments (crypts and villi), which can be separated and isolated to determine protein activity or gene expression. We use these techniques in wild type and mutant/transgenic mice to characterize the molecular properties distinguishing "resting" and "proliferating" cells, both during normal development and in cases of altered morphology and/or proliferation of the intestine. To induce tumorigenesis in the intestine, we use the large T antigen (TAg) encoded by polyomavirus SV40, which associates with key cellular proteins like pRBs and p53 and thus disrupts normal cellular regulation and proliferation in vivo and in vitro. The use of transgenic model systems expressing TAg and mutant derivatives in the intestine allowed us to show a prominent role of the pRB family and E2F2 -one of the E2F transcription factors they control- in mediating tumorigenic proliferation in this tissue, while we have also discovered instances in which cell proliferation occurs in the absence of the E2Fs (normal crypts) thought to be required for cell cycle entry and progression. We will continue to characterize the mechanisms and differences between normal and tumorigenic proliferation in vivo and in vitro.

Although the two best characterized cellular targets of TAg are the pRb (retinoblastoma) family, and the tumor suppressor p53, many other TAg targets have been described and await full study. We are also extending our studies to the oncoproteins encoded by other polyomavirus, by simultaneous use of biological assays, genetics and proteomics. Some of these viruses have already been associated with human diseases including cancer. However, although SV40 and other polyomavirus transform cells, the mechanisms used in each instance are not yet understood and different members of the same DNA tumor virus might have evolved distinct mechanisms for controlling cell biology.

Sáenz Robles MT, Case A, Chong JL, Leone G, Pip

Sáenz Robles MT, Case A, Chong JL, Leone G, Pipas JM. The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor regulates a xenobiotic detoxification pathway. PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e26019. Epub 2011 Oct 12. PMID: 22022495; PMCID: PMC3192141

P.L. Wenzel, J.L. Chong, M.T. Sáenz-Robles, A. Ferrey, J. P. Hagan, Y. M. Gomez, R. Rajmohan, N.

P.L. Wenzel, J.L. Chong, M.T. Sáenz-Robles, A. Ferrey, J. P. Hagan, Y. M. Gomez, R. Rajmohan, N. Sharma, H. Z. Chen, J. M. Pipas, M. L. Robinson, G. Leone. (2011) Cell proliferation in the absence of E2F1-3 Dev Biol 351:35

JL Chong, PL Wenzel, MT Sáenz-Robles, V Nair, A Ferrey, JP Hagan, YM Gomez, N Sharma, HZ Chen, M

JL Chong, PL Wenzel, MT Sáenz-Robles, V Nair, A Ferrey, JP Hagan, YM Gomez, N Sharma, HZ Chen, M Ouseph, SH Wang, P Trikha, B Culp, L Mezache, DJ Winton, OJ Sansom, D Chen, R Bremner, PG Cantalupo, ML Robinson, JM Pipas, G Leone. (2009) E2f1-3 switch from activators in progenitor cells to repressors in differentiating cells Nature 462:7275

M.T. Sáenz Robles, J.M. Pipas. (2009) T antigen transgenic mouse models Seminars in Cancer B

M.T. Sáenz Robles, J.M. Pipas. (2009) T antigen transgenic mouse models Seminars in Cancer Biology 19:229-235

M.T. Sáenz Robles, J.M. Pipas. (April 2009) To block or not to block p53-mediated apoptosis: All

M.T. Sáenz Robles, J.M. Pipas. (April 2009) To block or not to block p53-mediated apoptosis: All in the day’s work for SV40 T antigen  Proteins Killing Tumour Cells: Cell Death and Disease Series (Backendorf, Noteborn, Tavassoli, eds) ResearchSignPost
Dr. Sáenz-Robles received her Ph. D. in 1985 with Juan Pedro Garcia Ballesta at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, performed postdoctoral studies with Pat Simpson at the CNRS (France), Tom Korberg at UCSF (San Francisco), Matt Scott at Stanford University and Terry Van Dyke at the University of Pittsburgh, served as Director for Transgenic Mouse Facility at the University of Pittsburgh, and joined the Department in 1997.